Tag Archives: perennials Colorado

Fail Proof Perennials

Colorado’s climate can be harsh at times, so when it comes to planting beautiful horticulture, you want to make sure you have something you can continue to enjoy year after year. Plants that can handle Colorado’s drought-tolerant landscape and provide your backyard with color comes easy when you use these fail-proof perennials that can provide what you are seeking now and for years to come.

May Night Salvia

Fail-Proof Perennials

Salvia is a great choice for adding color. These deep violet-purple flowers sprout up to 18 inches with a green foundation and for those of you who love to watch the hummingbirds and butterflies, salvia attracts them with leaves that can leave a pleasant aroma.

 

Husker Red Penstemon

Fail-Proof Perennials

Source: Potters Road Nursery Inc.

These native flowers are a deep burgundy and prove to be drought resistant. While in bloom in early summer, white flowers with a touch of pink can grow up to 34 inches and draw in hummingbirds and other pollinators. They are rarely bothered by diseases or insects and would make a wonderful addition to your landscape.

Moonshine Yarrow

Fail-Proof Perennials

As many of you know this is a staple in many gardens. This flat-topped canary yellow cluster of flowers match well with a variety of colors. They bloom beginning in early summer and will rebloom if cut back after the first round of flowering.

Catmint

Fail-Proof Perennials

This easy to grow perennial has flowers in shades of pink, purple-blue and white while also unveiling a gray-green foliage that remains throughout the growing season. Loose spikes of flowers cover the soft, green mounds in late spring and early summer. When the blossoms fade you can cut plants back by half, or cut faded flower stems to the ground to encourage them to rebloom.

 

Rudbeckia

Fail-Proof Perennials

Last but not least we have Rudbeckia, also known as the “Denver Daisy”.

This hardy perennial will beautify any landscape for years to come! Rudbeckia is quite tolerant of drought after its first season of growth and can withstand a harsh environment. They are not prone to insects and pests and bring vibrant color to your landscape.

 

This is just the beginning of a long list of drought tolerant and gorgeous fail-proof perennials. The possibilities are endless.

Let Lifescape help you to design, construct and maintain your landscape?  Call 303-831-8310 to set up your consultation with our team of landscape experts today.

Bullet Proof Perennials

Perennials suited for the Denver climate provide your garden with year after year of foliage and blooms. Plants that can handle Colorado’s drought-tolerant landscape and provide your backyard with color comes easy when you use these bullet proof perennials.

May Night Salvia

Source: Garden Harvest Supply

May night salvia
These deep violet-purple flowers sprout up to 18 inches with a green foundation. They can attract butterflies and hummingbirds with leaves that can leave a pleasant aroma depending on your nose.

Red Husker Penstemon

Source: Iowa State University Extension

Husker Red Penstemon

Add a maroon-red to your yard with a drought-tolerant flower that is rarely bothered by diseases or insects. In early summer, white flowers with a touch of pink can grow up to 34 inches and provide hummingbirds with delicious nectar.

Moonshine Yarrow

Source: Conservation Garden Park

Moonshine yarrow
A staple in many gardens, this flat-topped canary yellow cluster of flowers match well with a variety of colors. They bloom beginning in early summer and will rebloom if cut back after the first round of flowering.

Cat Mint

Source: Moosey’s Country Garden

Catmint
Rising as much as three to four feet, this easy to grow perennial has flowers in shades of pink, purple-blue and white while also unveiling a gray-green foliage that remains throughout the growing season.

Daylily petite profusion mix

Source: Easy To Grow Bulbs

Daylily

A low-maintenance gardener’s best friend, few plants are as versatile or as rugged as this one with more than 10,000 cultivars or selective breeding that’s produced a size and flower color ideal for your landscape.

Top Perennials for Sheltered Gardens

A shade-tolerant Colorado landscape design sounds like an oxymoron, right? For the most part, Rocky Mountain gardens need to be designed for well-draining soil, water conservation and extreme weather conditions. However, the same mountainous geography we know and love has ample north-facing slopes that enjoy more shade than sun, and your own landscape may have large trees or buildings that provide shady spots in the summer.

In honor of these shady respites, we’ve put together a list of attractive perennials that enjoy the shade, but still do well in our climate.

Shade-Loving Perennials for Your Colorado Landscape Design

colorado landscape design

Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Bigroot Geranium. What’s not to love about these boisterous and colorful and hardy plants that provide beautiful green foliage displays, even while they aren’t in bloom? Here are some of our favorite features of bigroot geraniums (Geranium macrorrhizum) that are bound to be yours too:

  • Deer and rabbits pass them up
  • They can handle heat and cold
  • They don’t mind a little sunbathing now and again
  • Some varieties offer fall color

 

Geraniums grow up to about 2-feet tall, so give them room to flourish.

colorado landscape designers

Source: Sunset

Amethyst Flower. Did we have you at the name? These flowers live up to it, we promise. In addition to their bluish-purple color, the blooms of the amethyst flower (Browallia hybrids) are also star-shaped, which adds to their beauty. Their blooms range from white to violet and are so big they nearly cover the 2-foot-tall plant. Amethyst flowers are as happy in a container or hanging basket as they are in your flower beds.

Colorado landscape designers

Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Lungwort. Although the lungwort (Pulmonaria) may not sound like much, its fun and unusual blooms are surprisingly stunning. One of the lungwort’s most unique feature is its white spotted foliage (the reason for its name), which can add greater visual interest to your garden.

Other plants that thrive in shady spots include begonias, columbines, bleeding hearts, lily-of-the-valley, white wood aster and phlox.

Contact Lifescape Colorado for assistance designing and building your shady summer garden.

5 Favorite Colorado Native Perennials

A drought-tolerant landscape does not have to be defunct of color! There are several plants native to Colorado that are perfect for xeriscaping and offer year-round visual interest with vibrant colors, engaging textures and sculptural shapes. Here are five of our favorites that call Colorado home.

Rocky Mountain Columbine

This beautiful perennial has striking white and lavender petals surrounding a brilliant yellow center and grows up to two feet tall. As our state flower, the columbines not only celebrate the state of Colorado, but their fragrant blooms also attract hummingbirds, butterflies and bees.

colorado native plants

Source: Better Homes & Gardens

Liatrus

Liatrus form clusters of pink-lavender blooms atop narrow stems and grows in bunches, with each flower reaching a height from two to five feet. Requiring little water, all this hardy, low maintenance plant needs is well-drained soil. While deer typically stay away, butterflies and bees love the bright feathery spikes of liatrus.

colorado native flowers

Source: BHG

Purple Coneflower

Butterflies and bees are never far from these whimsical perennials with blooms in shades from white to pink and red to dark purple. The shape of a coneflower blossom is similar to a daisy, but the petals turn downward while the dark center reaches skyward. Great for hot-summer regions, these carefree perennials handle drought beautifully and only need light watering. In full sun, purple coneflowers bloom all summer long and can reach a height of four feet!

coneflower

Source: BHG

Sedum

These drought-tolerant plants can thrive even in poor soil and tend to do very well in sunny rock gardens or as a groundcover. Some varieties are low growing while others grow up to two feet tall. Sedum is perfect for full sun, high heat areas that many other plants cannot handle. Its delicate flower clusters sport shades of pink, purple, white or yellow.

colorado native plants

Source: RockWallGardens.com

Rocky Mountain Penstemon

Royal blue, red, pink or violet tubular blossoms cluster on the penstemon’s majestic spires and offer a dazzling burst of color. With their trumpet-like shape and sweet nectar, penstemons create a playground for hummingbirds. Drought-tolerant and easy to maintain, this Colorado native is fantastic choice for xeriscapes.

native colorado flowers

Source: Colorado State University Extension

Lifescape can help you create a colorful, energetic Colorado landscape that is also low-maintenance and drought-friendly. Contact the landscape design professionals at Lifescape today to find out more.

Perennials to Plant in August

If you are ready for some fresh new color in your garden, it is still too early for fall color and mums. So what can you plant? Well August is the perfect month for perennials.  Here are some great perennials that can be planted in August.

Bridges_penstemon

Bridge's penstemon

Sonoran Sunset. Bright violet flower spikes that grows to 15-18″ tall and 12-15″ wide.

Coronado. An orange selection, the Coronado Red is covered in small red blossoms, both grow to about 2-3′ tall and 2′ wide.

Sunset hyssop. This perennial has grey leaves and pink flowers with purple bract growing to 20-30″ tall and 18-24″ wide.

Bridge’s penstemon. This western native has scarlet-orange flowers and in mid-summer is great for attracting hummingbirds.

Orange Carpet Hummingbird trumpet. Also a hummingbird magnet, this orange perennial spreading low to the ground, 5-8″ tall by 1-2″ wide.

Little Trudy catmint. Blooms throughout the summer, a small version of the traditional blue-flowering catmint, this perennial does not grown taller than a foot.

What are you looking forward to planting in your Denver area garden this month?

 

Source and Photo Credit: www.alcc.com