Tag Archives: drought tolerant landscape in Colorado

Amp Up Efficiency with Smart Watering Tips

With warmer weather on the horizon, it’s time to review some smart watering tips to improve your landscape in Colorado. After all, amping up water efficiency is good for your pocket book, as well as the planet.

Follow these tips to optimize every last drop of water required by your irrigation system. Over the long run, you’ll enjoy a more sustainable landscape.

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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Use compost. Regardless of your soil type — sand, clay or loam — compost is one of the single most effective amendments you can provide your garden. In addition to increasing beneficial bioorganisms and nutrients that live underground, compost helps form small clumps of soil that serve as little water storage tanks plant roots can tap into. You can make your own compost at home or buy it from a local nursery.

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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Water early. Watering in the cooler evening hours sounds good in theory. In actuality, prolonged moisture on leaves and stems overnight makes them more prone to destructive fungus and disease. If possible, set your irrigation timer for the early morning hours. This allows plant roots to drink their fill before the water evaporates, but allows excess moisture on leaves and stems to dry completely. If you hand-water, the cool morning hours are a pleasant way to start the day out of the sun’s harsh glare.

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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Deep watering. Once plants and trees are established, practice deep and less frequent watering techniques. For most plants, a solid inch of water once a week will be sufficient. Many drought-tolerant plants will require even less. This encourages roots to grow deeper into the soil, rather than spreading out along the surface, which makes for a healthier and more stable landscape.

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Source: Kwaree

Install soaker hoses. Talk to your landscape maintenance team about installing soaker hoses around flower and vegetable beds. Soaker hoses provide a gentle, even water source without getting water on plant leaves and stems. Not only is much of this water wasted by evaporating before it can reach the roots, it puts the plants at risk for leaf scorch.

If you have any questions on watering techniques, contact Lifescape Colorado for advice regarding water-wise landscaping in Colorado.

Enhance Curb Appeal with a Colorful Garden Plan

Curb appeal can be achieved with front yard spaces that have a strong and balanced visual aesthetic. However, the most important thing to keep in mind is that your colorful garden plan enhances your home’s curb appeal for your own enjoyment.

Here are some ideas for creating a colorful landscape design for your Colorado lawn.

Source: Ivy Street Design via Houzz

Plant the curb. If you’re an urban dweller, take advantage of the parking strip – the area between the curb and the sidewalk. Planting this area with colorful flowers can transform a traditionally boring stretch of land. Once you’ve made an effort in this oft-neglected space, your neighbors may follow suit. We recommend planting drought-tolerant plants spaced with rock or mulch, so water requirements will be minimal to none.

Source: Twisted Vine Design via Houzz

Upgrade your mailbox. Make your mailbox a lush and cheerful focal point. Remove a circle of lawn surrounding the mailbox post and replace it with interesting groundcover, climbing flowers and flowering plants of different heights. Just make sure you prune your climbers regularly, so they don’t interfere with mail delivery.

Source: Gardens by Gabriel via Houzz

Integrate pavers. Pavers can be used for walkways, borders, steps and porches. Select attractive pavers in a color that complements your architecture. Consider planting grass seed or groundcover in between pavers spaced at wider intervals to add interest and minimize water consumption.

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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Think foliage, as well as flowers. Flowers get the bulk of the credit when it comes to colorful landscapes. But leaves can be equally effective at lending texture and color to your front yard landscape. Take a stroll around a nursery or botanical garden and analyze the shapes, patterns and colors (ranging from greens and yellows to reds and purples) found in plant leaves alone. Then, choose some favorites to add to your landscape.

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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Be bold. If you want a pop of color, grow some bright and contrasting plants in the same plant beds. Or, introduce an explosion of color around your main walk way and porch, and let the colors fade from there.

Contact Lifescape Colorado to design your front yard garden or to maintain your landscape, so it remains interesting and colorful all year long.

Gorgeous Drought Tolerant Landscapes

Does the term “drought tolerant landscape” conjure images of barren, rocky yards with a lone flowering cactus? You’re not alone. This is why clients are amazed when we’re able to execute a lush, colorful and interesting Colorado garden design, while adhering to green and sustainable water-wise landscaping principles.

We know the proof is in the proverbial pudding, so here are four examples of gorgeous gardens that incorporate drought-tolerant landscaping techniques.

Source: Coates Design Architects Seattle via Houzz

Patio oasis. By implementing natural rock and stone accents paired with plants that don’t require a lot of water to remain green, you can design a patio oasis. To accomplish this with your own patio:

  • Use pavers. You can choose pavers in a variety of colors, sizes and materials, such as natural stone, to become an artistic, as well as a functional foundation for your patio.
  • Plant a variety. Use a combination of drought-tolerant plants and trees of varying heights and widths to feel surrounded by foliage.

Source: Boxhill Design via Houzz

A sprawling work of art. There’s nothing drab or boring about this sprawling desert landscape full of beautiful colors. The Desert Museum Palo Verde adds vibrant green at and above eye-level. Below, you can see the rich purple hues of Babylon Verbena and bright bursts of red from Blue Elf Blooms. This landscape is proof that sustainable garden designs should never sacrifice visual interest.

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Source: Stepables

The illusion of a lawn. Giving up the lawn is one of the most difficult sacrifices for homeowners making the switch to a water-wise landscape. Using plenty of water-wise plants combined with drought-tolerant groundcover can ease your pain. Use low-maintenance ornamental grasses at varying heights and plants like Blue Star Creeper (Isotoma fluviatilis), which is a gorgeous lawn substitute.

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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Enhance corner sections. You can reduce your lawn square footage and save dramatically on water bills by cutting out the corner sections of your grassy areas and replacing them with water-wise plants. This way, you get the best of both worlds and it will make for a more visually interesting landscape to boot.

Contact Lifescape Colorado to augment your Colorado garden design with gorgeous water-wise plants, grasses and groundcover.

Nutrient Storehouse: 5 Great Reasons to Compost

If you’re a fan of the environment and efficiency, you’ll love composting. Compost is a nutrient storehouse created by recycled food and other organic biodegradable matter. Healthy compost can feed landscape and garden beds all season long. Plus, it also increases soil water-retention, which is one of the tenets of water-wise landscaping in Colorado.

Can you tell that Lifescape Colorado is a fan of composting? Soon you will be too! Here are five great reasons to compost.

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Source: Organic Gardening

Composting prevents drought. In our arid climate, drought is always an issue. This is one of the reasons why Lifescape Colorado advocates for planting native, drought-resistant plants. Your water-wise landscape will benefit from composting because it forms healthy soil clusters that work like sponges to soak and store water that roots can tap into for longer periods of time.

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Source: Organic Gardening

Boost your soil’s nutrient content. Your plants need vitamins and minerals just like you do. However, their only nutrient source is the soil their roots are planted in. As food scraps from your kitchen and other organic matter (leaves, livestock manure, etc.) break down, they form a nutrient-rich stew. (Note: If you’re not careful, your compost may do more harm than good. Only pesticide/herbicide-free materials should be composted). When this stew is mixed with the soil in your plant beds, plant roots have a way to tap into the nutrients they need.

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Source: Organic Gardening

Natural plant protector. Because compost-rich soil creates such healthy plants, you’ll find your landscape becomes more impervious to pests and diseases.

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Source: Organic Gardening

It can cleanup tainted soil. If you moved into a home where the previous owner used harmful pesticides and fertilizers, a healthy dose of compost may be just what the soil doctor orders. Compost has been shown to treat semivolatile and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), bind heavy metals and has even been known to eliminate pesticides and wood preservatives. All of this is good for the soil and great for our environment.

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Source: Organic Gardening

Long-term environmental benefits. In addition to cleaning up the soil, composting reduces the amount of garbage you send to the landfills, which also saves on fuel and transportation costs.

Interested in learning more about composting and water-wise landscaping? Contact Lifescape Colorado for more information today.