Tag Archives: container garden Denver

Front Porch Landscaping Ideas

The front porch has a special place in American history. It’s the ideal place to drink a cup of coffee in the morning or converse with family while dinner is cooking. Porches also encourage neighbors and passersby to stop for a moment and say hello. These front porch-landscaping ideas will get your porch in shape for spring and summer.

istock-9413506_front-porch-Mexican-tile_s4x3_lg

Source: HGTV

Extend your porch. Don’t have much of a front porch to speak of? You can extend it. Whether you extend it forward a bit or wrap it around the side, a larger porch creates space for comfortable furniture, as well as planters and container gardens. Things to consider:

  • Include lattice or some kind of skirting around the bottom to keep critters out
  • If you wrap it around, add another set of stairs so you have more than one way to enter/exit
  • Instead of a formal walkway, use stepping stones or space large pavers for access to auxiliary steps
Houzz

Source: Barnes Vanze Architects, Inc via Houzz

Consider the design. Porch design isn’t all that different from interior design. Consider how the porch is used and amend your decor and furnishings accordingly. Because this is a prelude to your home’s interior, the porch decor should complement your foyer and/or front living spaces.

HCRBL102_main-yard-1-house-exterior-after_s3x4_lg

Source: HGTV

Create a seamless transition. Create a seamless transition from your driveway and walkway to your porch by planting flowering shrubs and plants that grow as high, or slightly higher, than your porch floor. However, plants shouldn’t be high enough to impede the view. Consider blooming times and a balance of evergreens, so your porch has year-round interest. Lavender, jasmine and sweet peas are beautiful and will also emit a sweet fragrance when they bloom.

Houzz

Source: TruexCullins via Houzz

Use containers. Container gardening is ideal for porches. Using pots and containers in varying heights and sizes, you can create a layered and interesting front porch landscape. Hanging baskets are also a visual bonus. Make sure to plant ferns, impatiens and other shade-loving plants.

Contact Lifescape Colorado for professional front yard landscape design ideas for your porch. We also offer year-round landscape maintenance to keep your yard looking its best.

Tips for Landscaping Your Home for Selling

Enhancing curb appeal is the outdoor equivalent of staging a home. In fact, The National Association of Realtors found that 71 percent of homebuyers find curb appeal to be very important.

Here are a few tips for designing a front yard landscape that will lead buyers happily to your door.

Houzz

Source: Westover Landscape Design, Inc. via Houzz

Maintain what you have. If your yard is already landscaped, maintain it on a regular basis. Overgrown lawns and piles of leaves are unattractive and remind buyers of all the yard work that needs to be done. A well-groomed yard looks great and won’t conjure a single thought about weekend chores. If you aren’t able to do the work yourself, or the house is currently vacant, invest in a professional landscaper to keep it up week after week.

Houzz

Source: EASA Architecture via Houzz

Think low-maintenance. Not only will a low-maintenance landscape help you in the long run, but it will also be a wonderful selling point for your real estate agent to boast about. A water-wise garden design filled with native plants and shrubs is the way to go.

101414803.jpg.rendition.largest

Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Create a budget. If you need to create your landscape from scratch, determine your budget, and then stick to it. Remember that you’re selling your home, so while curb appeal is important, you don’t want to create your ultimate dream landscape.

BHG109746.jpg.rendition.largest

Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Strategic planting. The overall goal is to design a welcoming landscape. It should be cheerful and lead the eye right up to your front door. Choose colorful flowers and plant them strategically around your mailbox, at the corners of planters and walkways, flanking the front porch, etc. If you have a hard time selecting plants on your own, consult with a landscape professional or use an online resource to help plan your layout.

100233327.jpg.rendition.largest

Source: Better Homes and Gardens

How about those containers? Consider using container gardening and your investment will payoff two-fold. Not only do containers enhance curb appeal, they can be taken with you when you move or after the house sells.

Getting ready to sell your home? Contact the Colorado landscape design professionals at Lifescape Colorado to landscape your home for your big sale.

Celebrate Worldwide Plant a Flower Day!

Itching to get your green thumb back in the garden again? Then get ready to celebrate Worldwide Plant a Flower Day on March 12, 2014. On this day, you can honor the transformation that occurs after planting a seed, through germination and sprouting, to enjoying your first full blooms. Plus, it offers a good excuse to get a head start on growing your Colorado container gardens.

100420206.jpg.rendition.p

Source: Better Homes and Gardens

In our climate, seeds-to-seedlings do best when cultivated indoors this time of year. While the temperatures around March 12th may hint at Spring, we know the chances of another freeze or full-blown storm are high. Therefore, consider recycling old containers, such as yogurt or milk cartons, for your initial plantings. Wash them thoroughly, add drainage, use a high-quality chemical-free soil and plant the seeds of your choice.

100420199.jpg.rendition.largest.550

Source: Better Homes and Gardens

The writers at Everyday Gardeners recommend planing perennials that do well in our arid, high-elevation location. If you didn’t get your favorite bulbs into the ground last fall, you can cheat by using containers and still enjoy their colorful beauty this spring. Whether you choose to plant a single bulb in smaller pots, or a series of specifically placed bulbs in larger pots, container gardening will allow you to cultivate tulips, hyacinth, iris, daffodils and other cheerful blooms. You’ll have another chance to transplant them this fall.

home-design

Source: decordemon via Houzz

While your seeds are germinating, look around for other materials that can be recycled or re-purposed into permanent containers when your seedlings are ready to find a new home. By the time most of your seeds are ready to be transplanted, the weather will be much more stable. If you’re concerned at all about their well-being, use smaller containers that can be easily lifted, or put larger containers on flats with wheels before you plant them. That way, you can move your plants under cover, into the garage, or into the house to keep them out of the storm.

photo 2

Design by Lifescape Colorado

Don’t forget that Lifescape Colorado offers year-round maintenance and landscape services, and that includes your Colorado container gardens! Contact us to learn more.

Succulent Container Garden Designs

Houzz

Source: Janet Paik via Houzz

Colorado container gardens can add color and character to your landscape. They’re also the perfect venue for displaying unique and captivating succulents. While large containers can be a focal point on their own, smaller containers can be moved around at your whim, or brought indoors during the winter to preserve less hardy plants.

Designing your succulent container garden is a simple matter of form, color and inspiration.

Houzz

Source: Sitescapes Landscape Architecture & Planning via Houzz

Succulent 101

You’re most likely familiar with common succulents, such as Hen-and-Chicks (Sempervivum) or Jade Plant (Crassula ovata), but the world of succulents is vast. From the larger Agaves to smaller plants that replicate exotic corals, there are succulents of every shape, size and color variation. Visit a succulent nursery or peruse this article from BHG to view a wide sampling of your future medium. You’ll be better prepared to envision future container designs.

Houzz

Source: Le jardinet via Houzz

Choose the right container

One of the most wonderful features of succulents is their ability to grow in just about any container. From vertical frames to a small, chipped teacup, your container options are endless. There are two ways to approach your container design: create complements or opt for contrasts. A complementary design would match a container to the shape of the plant. Or, you might lean towards a pot that mimics the succulent’s color scheme. To contrast the plants with their containers, have fun and look for whimsical ways to create a relationship between the container and the plant inside.

Houzz

Source: Better Landscape and Gardens via Houzz

Same or different?

In some cases, you may want to designate one species of succulent per pot, and then arrange the pots to gain height, texture or color variations. Other times, you may choose to show off your succulent know-how by using a wide range of succulents in the same container, creating a veritable artist’s palate of interesting shapes and colors.

Houzz

Source: Better Landscape and Gardens via Houzz

Succulent Colorado container gardens are low-maintenance, requiring very little water or attention. However, Lifescape Colorado offers year-round landscape maintenance so your gardens and containers will always look their best.

Contact us to learn more about our landscape design and maintenance services.

Bold Container Garden Designs

Houzz

Source: Little Miracles Designs via Houzz

Bold container gardening is a simple way to impact your landscape design. Containers can fill a small garden space with a variety of blooms. And if you rent your home, you’ll have a fully landscaped yard that can move with you to your next home. Containers can be as permanent or as transient as you like. When Colorado container gardens are thoughtfully planned out, they add visual interest year-round.

Here are ideas for incorporating bold container garden designs into your landscape.

Houzz

Source: AMS Landscape Design Studios, Inc. via Houzz

Consider your architecture

One way to approach container gardens is to consider them an enhancement of your architecture.You can purchase containers that mimic the shape or color of your existing buildings and hardscape, using the plants to enhance decor. In this front yard design, the large terra cotta pots match similarly tinted pavers and form a wall-like hardscape from which the colorful geraniums greet visitors and passersby.

Houzz

Source: BLUE Renovation & Landscape via Houzz

Repetition

A series of matching containers can be used to stand out on their own, or they can be designed to tie into the surrounding architecture. The use of three vertical concrete pots with boxwood plantings mirrors the tree line and is mirrored again by the miniature versions on the table. You can also group similar pots together for a more powerful impact. The look will change depending on whether you use the same plants or opt to plant them all differently.

101227030.jpg.rendition.p

Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Bold containers

Your containers themselves can become the visual focus. The clever containers featured on bhg.com are interesting before you even plant them. Look around for used goods that can be re-purposed into container gardens, like tool boxes, slightly chipped ceramics, wheelbarrows or vintage pitchers and tubs.

100422932.jpg.rendition.largest

Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Miniature landscape plans

Consider your containers to be little landscapes when selecting and placing your plants. Create different heights, color patterns and think seasonally to keep them looking great all year. New to landscaping? Use these guides from bhg.com for inspiration, or hire a professional landscape designer to get started.

Contact Lifescape Colorado and design bold container gardens to accent your landscape.