Tag Archives: Colorado Landscape Designers

A Colorado Gardener’s April Checklist

It seems as if we were just rolling out Colorado Gardening Tips for January last week, and here April is already upon us! The good news for everyone is that our extended lead-up to spring provides extra time for procrastinators to catch up on winter chores and launch right into our spring checklist.

So, without further ado, here is your checklist for April gardens.


Source: Amy Renea via Houzz

Get your soil in shape. Finally, we get to plant! April is the month when the large majority of the frosts and freezes are behind us, and we can begin to plant with confidence. If you haven’t done so already, make sure to amend your soil so it contains just the right balance of airspace for aeration, hydration retention and microbes. You can hire the professionals at Lifescape Colorado to test your soil and make recommendations for healthy amending. And, of course, don’t forget to mulch!

Source: Jocelyn H. Chilvers via Houzz

Transplanting. Do you have some transplanting to do this season? Perhaps there’s a tree that needs to be relocated or a shrub with too many exposed roots? If so, this is the time to dig them up (take advantage of the moist and softened soil) and relocate them to their future home.


Source: Jocelyn H. Chilvers via Houzz

Bare root planting. Bare-root planting offers a way to save significant money on established plants, but you have to seize the planting window as it comes. That time is usually around mid- to late-April in Colorado. Examples of bare-root plants include fruit trees, roses, clematis, rhubarb, strawberries and asparagus. Pass up plants that have begun leafing out or have roots that appear dried up or rotten.

Design by Lifescape Colorado

Get your lawn in shape. April is the month to core-aerate your lawn. Removing slugs of grass and dirt keeps roots from getting choked off, allowing them to get the air, water and nutrients they need. Apply an organic fertilizer to give your plants a growth boost. Consider turning to a professional landscape maintenance company to ensure you lawn remains vibrant all season.

Contact Lifescape Colorado for professional spring landscaping assistance.

Fabulous Water-Wise Perennials for Colorado Gardens

As you begin to plan your spring garden, don’t neglect the power of growing native plants. There are multiple benefits to prioritizing native plants in your garden. They’re hardier and are able to withstand hot dry summers and freezing winters. They also require less water than non-native counterparts and will also attract birds, bees and butterflies to enhance your outdoor environment.

Sustainable plants are also a great choice, as they require zero to little watering for up to three years once established. Before you make your final selections, evaluate your landscape and identify which areas have well-draining soil and which areas get the most sun. These are the optimal locations for your drought-tolerant perennials.

Here are some suggestions for fabulous water-wise perennials that will keep you smiling year after year.


Source: Jocelyn H. Chilvers via Houzz

Jupiter’s Beard. This cheerful plant grows between 2- to 3-feet tall and 2-feet wide. This species (Centranthus ruber) has deep-pink blooms, while Centrathus alba has white blooms. They grow on upright stalks with blue-tinged leaves and will bloom from spring all the way through fall with regular deadheading. Butterflies love them!


Source: Jocelyn H. Chilvers via Houzz

Candy Tuft (Iberis sempervirens). Have a tumble of boulders you’d like to adorn? Meet Candy Tuft. Growing no more than 12-inches high, these crisp white blooms sit atop verdant green mounds of foliage. They look beautiful sitting between earthen gaps in rock formations or creating foreground interest in planters and edgings.


Source: Jocelyn H. Chilvers via Houzz

Western Spiderwort (Tradescantia occidentalis). This lush and delicate grass-like foliage combined with beautiful blue-purple blooms makes it hard to believe Western Spiderwort does so well in our arid climate. It’s a beautiful addition to your meadow or wild grass garden and will bloom from spring to early summer. It attracts butterflies, but is deer resistant.


Source: Jocelyn H. Chilvers via Houzz

Purple Mullein (Verbascum phoeniceum). This will look wonderful right alongside your Western Spiderwort, a wildflower garden or mixed-borders. Purple Mullein grows about 2-feet high and will spread just a little more than a foot. It’s a biennial with a relatively short spring blooming season. However, it does self-sow without taking over your garden bed.

Looking for the right Colorado native plants to enhance your sustainable, water-wise landscape? Contact the design professionals at Lifescape Colorado for more information.

Tips for Landscaping Your Home for Selling

Enhancing curb appeal is the outdoor equivalent of staging a home. In fact, The National Association of Realtors found that 71 percent of homebuyers find curb appeal to be very important.

Here are a few tips for designing a front yard landscape that will lead buyers happily to your door.


Source: Westover Landscape Design, Inc. via Houzz

Maintain what you have. If your yard is already landscaped, maintain it on a regular basis. Overgrown lawns and piles of leaves are unattractive and remind buyers of all the yard work that needs to be done. A well-groomed yard looks great and won’t conjure a single thought about weekend chores. If you aren’t able to do the work yourself, or the house is currently vacant, invest in a professional landscaper to keep it up week after week.


Source: EASA Architecture via Houzz

Think low-maintenance. Not only will a low-maintenance landscape help you in the long run, but it will also be a wonderful selling point for your real estate agent to boast about. A water-wise garden design filled with native plants and shrubs is the way to go.


Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Create a budget. If you need to create your landscape from scratch, determine your budget, and then stick to it. Remember that you’re selling your home, so while curb appeal is important, you don’t want to create your ultimate dream landscape.


Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Strategic planting. The overall goal is to design a welcoming landscape. It should be cheerful and lead the eye right up to your front door. Choose colorful flowers and plant them strategically around your mailbox, at the corners of planters and walkways, flanking the front porch, etc. If you have a hard time selecting plants on your own, consult with a landscape professional or use an online resource to help plan your layout.


Source: Better Homes and Gardens

How about those containers? Consider using container gardening and your investment will payoff two-fold. Not only do containers enhance curb appeal, they can be taken with you when you move or after the house sells.

Getting ready to sell your home? Contact the Colorado landscape design professionals at Lifescape Colorado to landscape your home for your big sale.

Create a Peaceful Garden Retreat for Relaxation

We’re fortunate to live in a climate that accommodates outdoor living for much of the year. Take advantage of this by amending your Colorado garden design to include a peaceful garden retreat. You can use it to read, journal or to sit quietly and enjoy the abundance of Mother Nature.

These tips will help you design and implement a relaxing retreat. You can always transform the most barren of landscapes into a luxurious oasis.


Source: This Old House

Have hope! Many clients are working with well established landscapes, which makes it easier to visualize the results of landscape remodels or add-ons. However, This Old House has an inspiring slide show about a couple who created their garden sanctuary from a completely blank and barren slate.


Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Plan well. As always, the best Colorado garden designs begin with a plan. Because you want to retreat, plot the exterior perimeter of your sanctuary and plant it with tall trees and shrubs to create a living privacy boundary. In addition to creating privacy, this boundary will block the view and buffer the sounds from streets, neighbor’s yards or even your own backyard activity areas.


Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Include seating. If you only have a small space or corner available, a single comfortable chair and table is a must. If your space is larger, consider adding benches or a chaise lounge. Incorporate a dining area that can be used for meals, projects, or socializing.


Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Build a water feature. Is there anything more soothing than the sound of water? From a small statue to a waterfall or koi pond, your water feature will be welcome addition for years to come. It also will help provide a sound buffer for homes located along busy streets.


Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Invite Mother Nature. Plant a fair amount of native plants known to attract pollinators, like butterflies, bees and moths, as well as birds. Science has proven the healing effects of our connection with nature. Plants, feeders and birdbaths can help forge these connections.

Contact Lifescape Colorado to begin designing your peaceful garden retreat today.

An Overview of Seeds for Spring

Are you planting a fair amount of seeds this spring? If so, these Colorado gardening tips can help you order just the right type and amount of seeds you need to yield a luscious and interesting landscape all year long.


Source: Strumelia’s Blog

Organize the seeds you have. Before you go too crazy with your seed catalogs or online seed shopping, take a careful inventory of what you have. While some seeds can sprout indefinitely (like hundreds of years-old Anasazi beans from our Colorado cliff-dwelling natives), most seeds have an expiration date. Cull through your collection and throw out any seed packets that have expired dates. If you have bagged your own seeds, or collected seeds from friends, check online to see how long they last. Keep in mind that you have to wait a precious two or three weeks before you’ll even know whether old seeds are viable.


Source: Ellwood Thompson’s

Order now! Some seeds can be purchased year-round, others are so popular that they sell out pretty quickly. If you have your heart set on the exact species you laid out in your winter garden plans, order ASAP to make sure you get the seeds you want.


Source: Insteading

Use heirloom seeds. Seeds have been hybridized, genetically modified and changed to grow and/or look better. As a result, many of them don’t pollinate (read: won’t attract butterflies and bees), and may even lack important phytonutrients. Planting heirloom seeds, which have been passed down for generations, preserves plant species that are going extinct. If you’re planting edibles, heirlooms are often tastier and healthier than their modified counterparts. Plus, you can harvest your own seeds for next year, or participate in local community seed exchanges.


Source: Alan Levine via Auntie Dogma’s Garden Spot

Plant perennials. Planting perennials that do well in our Rocky Mountain climate is an excellent way to see a return on your investment. Colorful perennials that do well in our area include Lupine, Columbine, Blue Flax and self-seeding Pinks — these do especially well when temperatures get chilly.

Once your landscape is blooming, contact Lifescape Colorado to learn more about how our landscape maintenance services can help keep your garden vibrant all year long.