Tag Archives: Colorado Landscape Designers

Colorful Annuals for Spring Container Gardens

There are so many reasons to incorporate container gardens into your Colorado landscape. Hanging or grounded, these gardens provide seasonal color to walkways, porches and patios. Plus, you can plant slightly off-season, since containers can be moved inside or under cover to avoid damage from late spring frosts or storms.

While containers can be planted with perennials, such as succulent containers, most landscapers use annuals to enjoy vibrant colors in different seasons.

The following are five superstar annuals for your spring container and basket gardens.

Source: Proven Winners via Houzz

Superbells Lemon Slice (Calibrachoa hybrid). Ready for some sunshine in your landscape? Superbells Lemon Slice look similar to petunias, but are actually Calibrachoa hybrids. They’re unique, bright and decidedly cheerful. They prefer full sun and require moderate water.

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Source: Log House Plants

Superbells Dreamsicle (Calibrachoa hybrid). Here’s another fun Calibrachoa hybrid for you in practically edible shades of pink, orange, yellow and purple. They’re colorful and interesting enough to be the sole star of a container or two.

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Source: Dave’s Garden

Chinese Spinach, Joseph’s Coat (Amaranthus tricolor). There are multiple reasons to use this hardy annual in your baskets or containers. The first is their unique, tri-color foliage that boasts color nearly year-round. The second is that its blooming period stretches from summer through fall. Thirdly, it can handle everything but soggy soil, making it a versatile addition with other plants.

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Source: H ELITE

Jewel of Africa (Tropaeolum majus). If you’re a gardener who appreciates the finished product more than the process, you can save some time by planting Jewel of Africas in a basket or container located where the plant can climb (it can grow up to 8-feet). It blooms in a variety of shades, including salmon, peach, apricot, scarlet and dark cream.

Source: Le jardinet via Houzz

Bonfire Begonia (Begonia boliviensis hybrid). What’s not to love about the Bonfire Begonia? It’s a stunner when trailing out of baskets, hates anything more than average watering, loves full sun and will draw humming birds like crazy from summer until our first fall frost.

Don’t forget that Lifescape Colorado offers landscape maintenance services, so you can enjoy healthy and colorful Colorado container gardens for most of our four seasons.

Prairie Winecups

Native perennials hold a position of honor in many Colorado landscapes, and at Lifescape Colorado, we encourage you to add these hardy plants for their beauty and drought tolerance. Callirhoe involucrata, commonly known as Prairie Winecups is one of our favorites. Here’s what you should know about this attractive flower.

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Source: Heisch, Randy via Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Prairie Winecups boasts dark green stems covered by rounded hairy leaves, which provide a striking backdrop for the cup-like magenta flowers. These blooms generously dazzle the landscape from early spring and throughout the summer.

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Source: Bransford, W.D. and Dolphia via Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

As this herbaceous plant typically reaches heights of only 6 to 12 inches and spreads out along the soil, it works beautifully as a perennial groundcover. You can expect the stems of each plant to amble out approximately three feet horizontally.

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Source: Flaigg, Norman G. via Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

In the wild, Prairie Winecups are often found growing in open, rocky areas and in the sunniest spots surrounding quiet glades. You’re less likely to spot them in full shade, as they prefer a lot of sunlight and warmth. While not particular about soil type, this perennial does prefer the soil’s pH to be slightly acidic.

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Source: Wasowski, Sally and Andy via Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

The same growing preferences naturally apply when introducing these to a cultivated landscape. Prairie Winecups feel at home anywhere with exceptional drainage and sunlight, whether this is out in the center of the garden or as edging near sunny walkways. Like many native plants in Colorado, this perennial can handle hot, dry periods making it appropriate for use in xeriscaping. Once established, this plant is very low-maintenance, requiring neither deadheading of blossoms nor pruning – unless you wish to do so for aesthetic purposes.

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Source: Bransford, W.D. and Dolphia via Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Winecups may be planted from seed or cuttings. If you search garden centers for this flower, other names you may encounter are Buffalo Rose and Purple Poppy Mallow.

At Lifescape Colorado, we bring landscapes to life. For more information about Prairie Winecups, other recommended plants and our landscape and garden services, please contact Lifescape Colorado today.

A Colorado Gardener’s April Checklist

It seems as if we were just rolling out Colorado Gardening Tips for January last week, and here April is already upon us! The good news for everyone is that our extended lead-up to spring provides extra time for procrastinators to catch up on winter chores and launch right into our spring checklist.

So, without further ado, here is your checklist for April gardens.

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Source: Amy Renea via Houzz

Get your soil in shape. Finally, we get to plant! April is the month when the large majority of the frosts and freezes are behind us, and we can begin to plant with confidence. If you haven’t done so already, make sure to amend your soil so it contains just the right balance of airspace for aeration, hydration retention and microbes. You can hire the professionals at Lifescape Colorado to test your soil and make recommendations for healthy amending. And, of course, don’t forget to mulch!

Source: Jocelyn H. Chilvers via Houzz

Transplanting. Do you have some transplanting to do this season? Perhaps there’s a tree that needs to be relocated or a shrub with too many exposed roots? If so, this is the time to dig them up (take advantage of the moist and softened soil) and relocate them to their future home.

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Source: Jocelyn H. Chilvers via Houzz

Bare root planting. Bare-root planting offers a way to save significant money on established plants, but you have to seize the planting window as it comes. That time is usually around mid- to late-April in Colorado. Examples of bare-root plants include fruit trees, roses, clematis, rhubarb, strawberries and asparagus. Pass up plants that have begun leafing out or have roots that appear dried up or rotten.

Design by Lifescape Colorado

Get your lawn in shape. April is the month to core-aerate your lawn. Removing slugs of grass and dirt keeps roots from getting choked off, allowing them to get the air, water and nutrients they need. Apply an organic fertilizer to give your plants a growth boost. Consider turning to a professional landscape maintenance company to ensure you lawn remains vibrant all season.

Contact Lifescape Colorado for professional spring landscaping assistance.

Fabulous Water-Wise Perennials for Colorado Gardens

As you begin to plan your spring garden, don’t neglect the power of growing native plants. There are multiple benefits to prioritizing native plants in your garden. They’re hardier and are able to withstand hot dry summers and freezing winters. They also require less water than non-native counterparts and will also attract birds, bees and butterflies to enhance your outdoor environment.

Sustainable plants are also a great choice, as they require zero to little watering for up to three years once established. Before you make your final selections, evaluate your landscape and identify which areas have well-draining soil and which areas get the most sun. These are the optimal locations for your drought-tolerant perennials.

Here are some suggestions for fabulous water-wise perennials that will keep you smiling year after year.

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Source: Jocelyn H. Chilvers via Houzz

Jupiter’s Beard. This cheerful plant grows between 2- to 3-feet tall and 2-feet wide. This species (Centranthus ruber) has deep-pink blooms, while Centrathus alba has white blooms. They grow on upright stalks with blue-tinged leaves and will bloom from spring all the way through fall with regular deadheading. Butterflies love them!

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Source: Jocelyn H. Chilvers via Houzz

Candy Tuft (Iberis sempervirens). Have a tumble of boulders you’d like to adorn? Meet Candy Tuft. Growing no more than 12-inches high, these crisp white blooms sit atop verdant green mounds of foliage. They look beautiful sitting between earthen gaps in rock formations or creating foreground interest in planters and edgings.

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Source: Jocelyn H. Chilvers via Houzz

Western Spiderwort (Tradescantia occidentalis). This lush and delicate grass-like foliage combined with beautiful blue-purple blooms makes it hard to believe Western Spiderwort does so well in our arid climate. It’s a beautiful addition to your meadow or wild grass garden and will bloom from spring to early summer. It attracts butterflies, but is deer resistant.

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Source: Jocelyn H. Chilvers via Houzz

Purple Mullein (Verbascum phoeniceum). This will look wonderful right alongside your Western Spiderwort, a wildflower garden or mixed-borders. Purple Mullein grows about 2-feet high and will spread just a little more than a foot. It’s a biennial with a relatively short spring blooming season. However, it does self-sow without taking over your garden bed.

Looking for the right Colorado native plants to enhance your sustainable, water-wise landscape? Contact the design professionals at Lifescape Colorado for more information.

Tips for Landscaping Your Home for Selling

Enhancing curb appeal is the outdoor equivalent of staging a home. In fact, The National Association of Realtors found that 71 percent of homebuyers find curb appeal to be very important.

Here are a few tips for designing a front yard landscape that will lead buyers happily to your door.

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Source: Westover Landscape Design, Inc. via Houzz

Maintain what you have. If your yard is already landscaped, maintain it on a regular basis. Overgrown lawns and piles of leaves are unattractive and remind buyers of all the yard work that needs to be done. A well-groomed yard looks great and won’t conjure a single thought about weekend chores. If you aren’t able to do the work yourself, or the house is currently vacant, invest in a professional landscaper to keep it up week after week.

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Source: EASA Architecture via Houzz

Think low-maintenance. Not only will a low-maintenance landscape help you in the long run, but it will also be a wonderful selling point for your real estate agent to boast about. A water-wise garden design filled with native plants and shrubs is the way to go.

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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Create a budget. If you need to create your landscape from scratch, determine your budget, and then stick to it. Remember that you’re selling your home, so while curb appeal is important, you don’t want to create your ultimate dream landscape.

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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Strategic planting. The overall goal is to design a welcoming landscape. It should be cheerful and lead the eye right up to your front door. Choose colorful flowers and plant them strategically around your mailbox, at the corners of planters and walkways, flanking the front porch, etc. If you have a hard time selecting plants on your own, consult with a landscape professional or use an online resource to help plan your layout.

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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

How about those containers? Consider using container gardening and your investment will payoff two-fold. Not only do containers enhance curb appeal, they can be taken with you when you move or after the house sells.

Getting ready to sell your home? Contact the Colorado landscape design professionals at Lifescape Colorado to landscape your home for your big sale.