Tag Archives: Colorado Landscape Designers

Beautiful Backyard Landscaping Design Ideas

Some garden planners can see a beautiful landscape in their mind’s eye, draw a sketch and begin listing where certain flowers and plants should go without a single consultation. Others need a little visual inspiration before they can commence with their Colorado landscape design. If you fall into the latter category, read on for a some beautiful garden design ideas.

http://www.bhg.com/gardening/landscaping-projects/landscape-basics/backyard-landscaping-ideas/#page=5

Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Elevate your landscape. Living in the Rocky Mountains doesn’t automatically mean you have a hilly landscape. Many of us city dwellers could use a little elevation to create interest. You can haul soil into your backyard, frame it with pavers or natural stone and enjoy a raised bed for a small lawn and/or garden. It can make a dramatic difference.

http://www.bhg.com/gardening/landscaping-projects/landscape-basics/backyard-landscaping-ideas/#page=1

Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Paver heaven. Pavers are a wonderful gift to the landscaping world. When you fill the spaces between them with green groundcover, you can create an area that’s exceptionally drought-tolerant and well-draining. Pavers also provide visual interest and can be used as a seating area, dining space, or a relaxing outdoor room for your family.

Source: Lori Smyth Design via Houzz

Create an outdoor room. With the addition of a fireplace or fire pit, you can increase your home’s square footage. Analyze your space carefully so you can provide appropriate wind blocks, lighting, heat sources, furniture, etc., to make the most of your outdoor room.

Source: Laidlaw Schultz architects via Houzz

Design an pond. A pond or water feature provides soothing sounds, a peaceful area to relax and a space to grow some water plants. They don’t have to be big — small ponds provide equal enjoyment and require significantly less work.

Source: JKT Associates, Inc. via Houzz

Use a living wall. There are all kinds of ways to create privacy in your backyard, but we’re fans of the living wall. A vertical garden is stylish, enhances your view and can be augmented seasonally to retain interest year-round.

As always, you can get in touch with Lifescape Colorado should you need any assistance along the way. We can help you design, build and maintain your masterpiece all year long. 

Fight Weed Growth the Organic Way

Weeding is a great way to spend time outdoors, get a little exercise and be productive in your garden. But when weeds proliferate, and you’re tired of spending countless hours in a seemingly endless endeavor, it’s tempting to grab the strongest chemical weed killer on the market and go to war. Even so, you should really reconsider before doing this. All those chemicals are terrible for the long-term health of your soil, your garden and the environment.

Instead, fight weed growth the organic way. The following gardening tips will help you win the battle against weeds in your Colorado garden without doing any further harm to your surrounding environment.

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Source: Organic Gardening

Get to know your weeds. The best way to fight weeds is know what you’re battling. Use a field guide to identify new growth, so you can plan the best route to eradication. You’ll be able to deal with everything from shallow-rooted annuals to deep-rooted perennials.

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Source: Organic Gardening

Prevention is the next step. Once you know which weeds you may be up against, preventing them from seeding is the next step to starting your organic weed control campaign. Try:

  • Using a broad fork. Rototilling brings deeply buried seeds up to the surface to germinate. A broad fork, rather than digging or tilling, loosens the soil without unearthing as many pesky seeds.
  • Waiting. Once your beds are prepared, wait three to four days so you can remove the weeds that germinate before planting.
  • Mulching. Use a seed-free straw or a thick layer of mulch around seedlings to block remaining weed seeds from sunlight.
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Source: Organic Gardening

Remove them with roots intact. Deep-rooted weeds should be removed with their roots intact. Wait for a rain shower or after a good soaking so the soil is moist enough, then pull them up by the base. Don’t yank them or you risk breakage. Without any roots/runners left underground, they can’t come back.

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Source: Organic Gardening

Dig ’em out. For particular tenacious weeds, be prepared to dig. It may take a few sessions to remove the entirety of the weed’s roots and runners.

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Design by Lifescape Colorado

Plant densely. Let your own native and drought tolerant landscape choke weeds out rather than the other way around.

Are you interested in growing a sustainable and weed-free garden? If so, contact us at Lifescape Colorado to get your garden in tip top shape the healthy way.

Amp Up Efficiency with Smart Watering Tips

With warmer weather on the horizon, it’s time to review some smart watering tips to improve your landscape in Colorado. After all, amping up water efficiency is good for your pocket book, as well as the planet.

Follow these tips to optimize every last drop of water required by your irrigation system. Over the long run, you’ll enjoy a more sustainable landscape.

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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Use compost. Regardless of your soil type — sand, clay or loam — compost is one of the single most effective amendments you can provide your garden. In addition to increasing beneficial bioorganisms and nutrients that live underground, compost helps form small clumps of soil that serve as little water storage tanks plant roots can tap into. You can make your own compost at home or buy it from a local nursery.

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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Water early. Watering in the cooler evening hours sounds good in theory. In actuality, prolonged moisture on leaves and stems overnight makes them more prone to destructive fungus and disease. If possible, set your irrigation timer for the early morning hours. This allows plant roots to drink their fill before the water evaporates, but allows excess moisture on leaves and stems to dry completely. If you hand-water, the cool morning hours are a pleasant way to start the day out of the sun’s harsh glare.

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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Deep watering. Once plants and trees are established, practice deep and less frequent watering techniques. For most plants, a solid inch of water once a week will be sufficient. Many drought-tolerant plants will require even less. This encourages roots to grow deeper into the soil, rather than spreading out along the surface, which makes for a healthier and more stable landscape.

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Source: Kwaree

Install soaker hoses. Talk to your landscape maintenance team about installing soaker hoses around flower and vegetable beds. Soaker hoses provide a gentle, even water source without getting water on plant leaves and stems. Not only is much of this water wasted by evaporating before it can reach the roots, it puts the plants at risk for leaf scorch.

If you have any questions on watering techniques, contact Lifescape Colorado for advice regarding water-wise landscaping in Colorado.

Gorgeous Drought Tolerant Landscapes

Does the term “drought tolerant landscape” conjure images of barren, rocky yards with a lone flowering cactus? You’re not alone. This is why clients are amazed when we’re able to execute a lush, colorful and interesting Colorado garden design, while adhering to green and sustainable water-wise landscaping principles.

We know the proof is in the proverbial pudding, so here are four examples of gorgeous gardens that incorporate drought-tolerant landscaping techniques.

Source: Coates Design Architects Seattle via Houzz

Patio oasis. By implementing natural rock and stone accents paired with plants that don’t require a lot of water to remain green, you can design a patio oasis. To accomplish this with your own patio:

  • Use pavers. You can choose pavers in a variety of colors, sizes and materials, such as natural stone, to become an artistic, as well as a functional foundation for your patio.
  • Plant a variety. Use a combination of drought-tolerant plants and trees of varying heights and widths to feel surrounded by foliage.

Source: Boxhill Design via Houzz

A sprawling work of art. There’s nothing drab or boring about this sprawling desert landscape full of beautiful colors. The Desert Museum Palo Verde adds vibrant green at and above eye-level. Below, you can see the rich purple hues of Babylon Verbena and bright bursts of red from Blue Elf Blooms. This landscape is proof that sustainable garden designs should never sacrifice visual interest.

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Source: Stepables

The illusion of a lawn. Giving up the lawn is one of the most difficult sacrifices for homeowners making the switch to a water-wise landscape. Using plenty of water-wise plants combined with drought-tolerant groundcover can ease your pain. Use low-maintenance ornamental grasses at varying heights and plants like Blue Star Creeper (Isotoma fluviatilis), which is a gorgeous lawn substitute.

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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Enhance corner sections. You can reduce your lawn square footage and save dramatically on water bills by cutting out the corner sections of your grassy areas and replacing them with water-wise plants. This way, you get the best of both worlds and it will make for a more visually interesting landscape to boot.

Contact Lifescape Colorado to augment your Colorado garden design with gorgeous water-wise plants, grasses and groundcover.

How to Design a Drought-Tolerant Landscape

If you live in Colorado, you’re no stranger to drought conditions. These past years have been dry ones and municipalities are becoming more rigid regarding non-essential water use. Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to design a drought-tolerant landscape in Colorado that can yield a lush and interesting look with minimal water consumption.

Here are a few tips for designing a sustainable landscape that can weather the dry years, as well as the Rocky Mountains’ extreme temperature variations and soil conditions.

Design by Lifescape Colorado

Evaluate site conditions. Patience is a virtue for landscape designers. Use a season or two to evaluate your site, noting which areas tend to get the most and least water, as well as sun and/or shade. By evaluating your landscape, you can make better choices about which plants should go where. For example, the more moist areas of your yard — around downspouts or at the base of slopes — can be used for plants that require more water. You can save sandier, dryer patches for drought-resistant plants.

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Source: Thomas J. Story via Sunset

Amend your soil where needed. If you aren’t sure how a particular section of soil will react with water, dig a hole at least 12-inches deep and fill it with water. If the water drains immediately, you’ll need to amend it with organic materials, such as compost or leaf mulch. If the water pools and stays put for 30-minutes or more, you’ll need to add sandier soil amendments to increase porosity.

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Source: Norm Plate via Sunset

Replace or reduce your lawn. Lawns are not considered drought tolerant. Consider replacing your lawn, or a good portion of it, with colorful stone and ornamental plants. Ornamental grasses will provide a burst of green, while requiring significantly less water than a lawn.

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Source: Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Add color with drought tolerant plants. Our high-desert landscape is bursting with native color. You can achieve the same by planting native, drought-tolerant plants such as:

Once established, these plants can survive on rainfall and snow melt alone.

Would you like professional assistance designing a drought-resistant Colorado landscape plan for your property? Contact us at Lifescape Colorado for more information about our services.