Tag Archives: Colorado landscape Design

Natural Hardscaping Designs

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Source: Margie Grace – Grace Design Associates via Houzz

Natural hardscape designs may seem like an oxymoron. However, Lifescape is dedicated to providing Colorado hardscaping services that blend with our clients’ natural surroundings. The term “hardscaping” refers to the non-living aspects of your backyard and garden designs and, surprisingly, these additions can add a soft natural look to your garden.

The following ideas can inspire you as you make your landscaping plans for the new year.

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Source: Jeffrey Gordon Smith Landscape Architecture via Houzz

Pathways

Consider using bulk materials for your garden paths. Options include gravel, mulch or decomposed granite. These materials will create a clear path, but the edges will be softer and provide a more fluid boundary between the path and your landscape.

Gravel paths can have a variety of looks, based on the size and color of the gravel. This brown gravel path complements the color of the home’s exterior and looks natural in the environment. It leads to an expanded area of gravel, rather than a cement patio, which enhances the soft look. Larger pebbles and stones create an entirely different look. They’re ideal in settings with a water feature, since they mimic the environment of a lake shore or ocean. A mulch path lends the most natural look of all. When it’s unfettered by a border, it appears as if it’s been there all along.

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Source: Arterra LLP Landscape Architects via Houzz

Planted pavers

Pavers are a multi-purpose landscaping tool. While they can be used to create a traditional hardscape path or patio, leaving a little space around these features can change their appearance. You can intentionally plant these spaces, fill them with pebbles or colored gravel, or leave them empty and let Mother Nature take over. Even a modern landscape design is softened with spaced pavers, such as this one. Hard concrete pavers are spaced with various gravel patterns.

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Source: Dean Herald-Rolling Stone Landscapes via Houzz

Consider the foliage

The plants you select also have an effect on hardscaping aesthetics. Use a higher ratio of plants to hardscape to immediately soften the effects. Choose round and soft plants to hide firm edges of hardscape planters and boundaries.

Contact Lifescape to learn more about our Colorado hardscaping and landscaping services.

Beautiful Lighting Types for Front Yard Gardens

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Source: Root Design Company.com via Houzz

Beautiful outdoor lighting welcomes guests, enhances curb appeal and amplifies nighttime safety. At Lifescape Colorado, professional landscape designers take a comprehensive approach to our clients’ designs. In addition to planning attractive landscape and hardscape features, we will discuss lighting options that will bring your landscape to life at night.

The following are ways we implement our Colorado lighting services, adding beautiful illumination to front yard gardens.

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Source: Noel Cross+Architects via Houzz

Balance

Creating an attractive outdoor lighting design is all about balance. Your design should incorporate a mix of entryway lights and pathway lighting. It should also utilize uplights and downlights to illuminate key landscape and hardscape features. The key is to strike the right balance of intensity. Ideally, the lights should be minimal at the end of the driveway, and then increase in volume and intensity as guests approach the front door.

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Source: FORMA Design via Houzz

Safety

While beauty may be your main objective, safety should also be a priority. There are multiple options when illuminating paths and stairs. Traditionally, this is done using modest downlights that provide a direct source on the path. We can also build the lights into your hardscape features, such as your stairs or columns. Uplights will illuminate vertical surfaces, while simultaneously lighting walkways and porches.

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Source: McKay Lighting via Houzz

Highlights

Use your lighting design to highlight some of your favorite landscape features. Uplighting can highlight an impressive tree or shrub, while leaving enough shadowy recesses to provide privacy and a hint of drama. Adding lights to your water feature will create a magical glow and transform cascading water into a sparkling work of art.

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Source: Gabberts Design Studio via Houzz

Ambiance

Once you have covered the basics, it’s time to have a little fun. Consider using light bulbs that are slightly tinted to avoid a harsh glow. For example, purchasing bulbs or light fixtures with gold or orange glass will create a warm glow. You can even incorporate small lights in a covered porch, reminiscent of the night sky.

Lifescape Colorado offers full-service landscape maintenance to keep gardens looking their best, refreshing your lights as needed. Contact us to learn more about our Colorado lighting services.

Mojave Sage

Year-round color, aroma and height. These are just a few of the benefits your garden will gain from growing the Mojave Sage. This sub-shrub perennial thrives in full sun, well-drained soil, high altitudes and extremely dry conditions. Guaranteed to be a standout in xeriscape designs, the Mojave Sage is not only drought-tolerant and low-maintenance — it is also semi-evergreen, which empowers even winter landscapes with beautiful interest.

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Source: Plant Select

Mojave Sage blooms all summer long and into late fall with gorgeous textures and hues. Plant Select describes the show-stealing xeriscape perennial as having “beautiful, intensely aromatic silvery-green foliage, topped with densely whorled bracts of lovely smoky mauve-purple that surround delicate violet-blue flowers.”

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Source: Waterwise Landscapes Incorporated via Houzz

What’s particularly striking about the Mojave Sage flowers is the slight color variegation of the outer petals and inner petals, which dawn slightly different shades of purple, blue, lavender, mauve and rose. Because its big, bright blossoms are beloved by birds, bees and hummingbirds, the Mojave Sage also carries common names like Blue Sage, Mountain Desert Sage, Rose Sage and giant-flower sage.

The soothing fragrance of the Mojave Sage is an archetype of the plants overall laid-back way of life. This xeriscape plant requires little watering and pruning. On top of this, the sage is rarely phased by heat or cold. Therefore, xeriscape gardeners join birds, bees and butterflies in a special fondness for this hardy plant.

Benefits go beyond garden design too. Wonderful natural remedies can also be enjoyed by growing Sage, also called Salvia, which is Latin for “to save, redeem or heal.”

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Source: Waterwise Landscapes Incorporated via Houzz

After a couple of growing seasons, the Mojave Sage can reach up to 36 inches in height and width, making it a perfect plant for creating a pretty backdrop. Lavendula, Penstemon, Coreopsis and creeping Veronica are some recommendations to plant in conjunction with Mojave Sage to create a full and vibrant garden design.

Let the passionate experts at Lifescape Colorado help you achieve a xeriscape that will improve not only curb appeal and property value, but also your quality of life. For a natural therapeutic beauty that can be enjoyed all year long, contact us online or call 303-831-8310.

Essential Features for Winter Outdoor Spaces

Backyard barbeques and pool parties aren’t as popular in near freezing temperatures, but there’s no need to stay cooped up inside. Implementing essential Colorado hardscaping features will allow you to enjoy your backyard well into the winter too.

Here are Lifescape’s recommendations for must-have hardscape and landscape features for your backyard this winter, including pictures from our own project portfolio.

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Design by Lifescape Colorado

Let there be fire. Humans are always drawn to fire, whether they live in a warm tropical environment or a cooler mountain climate like ours. Adding a backyard fire pit or fireplace is one of the most important steps in making your outdoor space habitable through the colder seasons. You can also add portable space heaters around the edges, so you and your guests can stay warm on all sides.

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Source: Frederick + Frederick Architects via Houzz

Another way to make the most of an outdoor fireplace is to completely enclose your porch. You’ll be protected from humidity and mosquitoes in the summer and insulated from the elements in the winter.

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Design by Lifescape Colorado

A steamy hot tub. Hot tubs are a year-round investment. They’re soothing on a cool summer evening, but are most delightful on a crisp winter night. Hot tubs also provide a comfortable spot to star gaze at night.

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Source: Bonny Weil General Contractor via Houzz

Prepare your deck. Make sure your deck is in shape before the worst of the winter weather hits. If the wood looks worn, or your paint is chipped and fading, have it repaired, treated and sealed in the fall, so it isn’t compromised by winter’s moisture.

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Design by Lifescape Colorado

Add some color. You can use existing planter beds or container gardens to add festive appeal. Once you’ve cleared out last season’s remainders, insert evergreen boughs, redtwig dogwood branches, holly and other winter-themed plants and accents.

Contact Lifescape. We look forward to helping you plan a Colorado hardscape design that will keep you warm this winter.

How to Landscape for Privacy

While cities offer accessibility, excitement and culture, it can also mean traffic, noise and lack of privacy. This can make us long for a more rural lifestyle. Fortunately, landscaping can create a rural oasis in the midst of the action, and it will also add desirable privacy too.

The following suggestions will provide privacy from the outside world. Or, you can integrate a private nook within your Denver landscape design.

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Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Structural Privacy

One of the fastest ways to gain instant privacy is to use hardscaping. Fences, lattice work and screens can work to provide a no-view or partial-view of the outside world.

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Source: mark pinkerton – vi360 photography via Houzz

Fences. A traditional fence is always a good option for creating a backyard oasis that is kept entirely separate from the outside world. It works in larger spaces, but a smaller backyard may end up feeling boxed in if you aren’t careful.

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Source: Susan Cohan, APLD via Houzz

Panels or Lattice work. These vertical panels of lattice are more solid than traditional lattice work. By painting them, you can enhance the design appeal for backyard guests. They also provide privacy, while still allowing an outside view. You can use solid paneling for a more stylish barrier.

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Source: Carson Poetzl, Inc. via Houzz

Screens. Even freestanding screens can be used for privacy. To winter winds, you will want to reinforce them with metal or wooden posts. Climbing plants can be added for color and greenery.

Fall is the season to design and build your hardscaping, so it’s ready to go when warmer weather returns.

Living Privacy

Besides the use of climbing plants to create privacy on trellises, you can use containers and fast-growing plants for a softer barrier between you and your neighbors.

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Source: Mark English Architects, AIA via Houzz

Containers. Large-scale containers are an artful way to create a partial physical barrier. Grasses, flowering plants and trees can be added to soften the effect.

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Source: Stephanie Ann Davis Landscape Design via Houzz

Fast-growing plants. Bamboo and horsetail are both fast-growing and tenacious plants. However, when you contain their roots, they make an excellent living fence.

The best of both worlds. This Better Homes and Gardens article has beautiful examples of how hardscaping and landscaping can be combined to enhance privacy and visual interest.

The design experts at Lifescape are eager to assist you and your Denver landscape design.