Top Native Plants of the Mountains

Winter is the season to plan next year’s garden. At Lifescape Colorado, we’re committed to implementing green and sustainable landscapes, which means planting more Colorado native plants. After all, our native plants are more drought- and fire-resistant than other non-native counterparts.

As you begin sketching your garden layout, make sure to include the following top native plants of the mountains in your design.

Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Korean feather reedgrass (Calamagrostis brachytricha). If you love the soft, feathery and low-maintenance presence of ornamental grasses, Korean feather reedgrass is a great alternative to overused varieties seen everywhere else. They grow about 2 feet high and the feathered, flowered stalks will soar to about 3 to 4 feet high. The flowers have a light pink tinge when they bloom in the late summer, and they fade to a pale golden shade, which adds interest during the winter months.

Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Indian Paintbrush (Castilleja integra). It’s no surprise how this fire-resistant native flower got its name. The fiery, orange-red color of an Indian Paintbrush is actually comprised of bracts, not flowers. Its flowers are much smaller and interspersed amidst the bracts. Indian Paintbrush thrive with full sun and well-drained soil. You’ll also love the hummingbirds it attracts.

Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Pasqueflower (Pulsatilla patens). It makes good sense to list Pasqueflowers next because they look great next to Indian Paintbrush. They also enjoy the same soil, sun and low-water environment. They non-aggressively reseed on their own.

Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Prickly Pear (Opuntia polyacantha). Who doesn’t love a Prickly Pear cactus for a unique and interesting change from traditional greenery and flowers. While they remain a gray-green cactus year-round, you’ll enjoy bright yellow and pink blooms in the spring. And, of course, they’re the ultimate in drought-resistance.

Source: Better Homes and Gardens

Red Hyssop (Agastache rupestris). Your Colorado landscape will benefit from both texture and color when you plant Red Hyssop. This greenery has a silver sheen and the tall, graceful blooms add splashes of apricot, red, salmon or magenta, depending on the varieties you select. Red Hyssop is also a favorite amongst butterflies and hummingbird. Plus, deer and rabbit will leave them alone!

Contact the design team at Lifescape Colorado to plan your landscape using hardy Colorado native plants.

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